News

Saxophone, Saxophones & Saxophones

The 2017 NAMM Show was exciting with new finishes on Saxophones. We saw Gold Lacquer, Antique, Champagne, Crystal, Black, White, Red Lacquer, and almost any kind of finish you can imagine.

We played other Saxophones from various other manufacturers, and it is amazing that there are just so many of them. Pricing ranging from inexpensive to very high. It came to our conclusion - The inexpensive ones do play, but not easy to blow, tone is dead, and for beginner saxophone players - the drop out must be huge.. The expensive ones played well, great tone, and easy to play.. Alas, unless you are an advance student, then yes get that expensive instrument..

You want to save some $$$, then check out either the Rheuben Allen Saxophone line or the Kenny G Saxophone line. You will not be disappointed. 

We saw the Kenny G Saxophone line - 85% Copper Soprano, Alto, & Tenor Saxophones - By they way not being self promoting but it played the best. Rich tone, easy to play, and loved the engraving. Medium Priced compared to similar. I am sure I will see this type next year at the other manufacturers. 

All in All it was a great show..

 Coming Soon the Website...

Thanks for Reading!!!

Full article →

Killer Deal Discount on Kenny G Saxophones and Rheuben Allen Saxophones

Here is a deal for those looking to get the Kenny G Saxophones or the Rheuben Allen Saxophones. The 2017 NAMM Show is coming and we need to clear our racks for the NEW Models. Save 10% on Orders over $700.00. 

Starting January 6 to January 24, 2017 - Use: NAMM 2017-10 (Only one discount per E-Mail)  

Check it out at: https://kdimusic.com/

 

 

Full article →

All About the Sax!!

The saxophone is one of the most interested and versatile musical instruments in use today. It was designed to fill a niche between woodwind and brass instruments, and it has since found uses in many different musical applications from military bands to symphony orchestras. It is one of the most easily recognizable instruments by both sight and by its sound, and its unique characteristics have made it a favorite instrument with musicians all over the world. Most people know about the alto sax and the tenor saxophone, but many people may not know that there are actually nine types of saxophones.

The Saxophone Family

The saxophone family consists of nine different instruments, although only four are commonly played. The following sections describe the most common saxophones from the soprano sax to the baritone sax.

Soprano Saxophones

The Soprano Saxophone consists of the smallest members of the saxophone family. There are three main versions of the soprano saxophone, and they are mainly of straight designs as opposed to the common image of curved saxophones. The soprano is one of the hardest types of saxophones to learn how to play properly, so it is not recommended for beginners. It is used most commonly in Jazz applications due to its higher pitch.

Alto Saxophones

The Alto Saxophone is larger than the soprano and is considered a medium-sized saxophone. It is the most commonly played type of saxophone because of its size and ease of use. It is the easiest of all the saxophones to learn how to play. It has a small mouthpiece, which limits the amount of intonation the musician can apply to the sound, making it more consistent. It is mainly designed with the classic saxophone curve at the bottom of the instrument, but they can be designed as straight or having only a slight curve. Altos are used is classical music compositions but can also be applied to jazz and contemporary music as well.

Tenor Saxophones

The Tenor Saxophone is slightly larger than the alto and is still considered medium-sized. It, along with the alto saxophone are the most common type of saxophone due to their size and ease of use. The mouthpiece on the tenor saxophone is larger than that on the alto, making it more suitable for more skilled musicians who can take advantage of the additional intonation characteristics of its size. The tenor saxophone is almost always a classic curved design and it is known as the most versatile of all the saxophone family. It is used extensively in jazz, but is also popular in rock and classical applications as well.

Baritone Saxophones

The Baritone Saxophone or just known as the "Bari" is the largest of the regular family of saxophones. Its size and weight make it the least commonly used of the regular saxophones. It is difficult for musicians to produce proper intonations through it, so it is not a good beginner saxophone. It does have a deep and rich tone which still makes it popular for many different music genres.

 

Thanks for Reading!!!

KDI Music, LLC

 All images are used by permission from the respective photographers.

Full article →

Improving your Saxophone Playing by Tuning Properly

Tuning Properly

When most saxophonists tune up they use a middle G or F-Sharp. The main problem with this is that the middle G or F-Sharp is traditionally very sharp notes... usually 30 cent plus if the embouchure is not adjusted. The young saxophonist will generally not know where these notes are just by playing them alone. When the student pulls the mouthpiece out far enough to make the unaltered F-Sharp or G play in tune then the lower register of the instrument sill most certainly be flat.


How to fix this problem:

There are two simple things that can be done. One have the saxophonist play the G or F-Sharp in the lower register. These notes are normally much closer to being in tune and will allow the young saxophonist to learn where to play the middle D, D-Sharp, E, F, F-Sharp and G on the alto. To play any of these notes in tune the embouchure must be slightly altered.

The second option is to have the alto saxophonist play a first finger B natural, hold it for a while and then play the middle G or F-Sharp. This will allow the saxophonist to make the necessary adjustments to the embouchure when they hear the interval from the first finger B to the middle note.

Ask any saxophonist of any level of playing to play a middle F-Sharp out of the air as their first note and it will likely not be as in tune as if they played the first finger B before playing the F-Sharp.

*It is important to remember that the saxophone is generally an out of tune instrument. It is by the nature of the design that the instrument is always a challenge to play in tune. When you change a reed... when the room is to hot or cold.... a pad leaks... All of these things change the intonation of the instrument.

*The best way to play any instrument in tune is of course to...... hear it in tune! Practice with your tuner... now they do not need to get crazy with the tuner and bring it with them everywhere... When I see a guy get a tuner out before anyone has played I am pretty sure he cannot trust his ears.... use the tuner at home or just to get the first note where you need it.... then put it away.....

You must first hear in tune to play in tune.....

Thanks for Reading, and please stop by www.kdimusic.com for all the best in Musical Instruments.

Our Motto: “A Passion for the Perfect Sound!”

Full article →

The Saxophone and Emergency Repair

The Saxophone and Emergency Repair


What does anybody really need to know about the saxophone and emergency repair?

The answer is not so much. I see a lot of repairmen offering emergency repair kits... complicated things to work with and a lot of advice on the technical way to do the repair.

All repairs of the saxophone that can be made fast by the Band Director or knowledgeable Player at a concert, football game or rehearsal are simple. Most things on the saxophone can be fixed with a few things: Rubber Bands of many different sizes and strengths... buy a bag at the 99-cent store for a buck, Saran Wrap, thin double sided tape and or dental tape, a small screwdriver to tighten a pivot screw or rod and a spring hook incase a spring comes off. A small amount of pads might be good. However unless every saxophonist in your band is playing the same brand and model of saxophone the number of pads necessary could prove to be too large to carry everywhere.. It may be too hard and expensive to keep in stock. So I will talk about using the things you have at hand.

The word emergency itself tells you it only needs to work for a short while. To get you through that football game... then you can take it to the repairman...

So if a spring breaks: You can use one of the rubber bands and fine a way for it to connect to the instrument and lift the key up or hold it down. Choose a rubber band that is about the same tension as the keys on the instrument after it is hooked up.

If a pad is torn: And it will not seat cover it with Saran Wrap and use a rubber band to hold it on.... it might look funny, feel

different to the student when the key is pressed but it will work.

If a pad falls out: Put it back in with the thin double sided tape. Then Wrap it with Saran Wrap and Rubber Band to make sure it stays in the pad cup. Put the Saran Wrap over the face of the pad, pull it to the top of the pad cup, twist it and use the rubber band to hold it in place.

Eric Marienthal one of the great modern saxophonist pretty much always has Saran Wrap on his palm key pads. After seeing Eric’s saxophone I often thought that I would put Saran Wrap on my palm keys and maybe I would play better... I tried it... it just didn’t work for me like I wanted...

If a pad sticks: Put some baby power on it and work it up and down a few times...

Lose a pad:
If your saxophone player looses the pad then fold some paper in the pad cup until it looks about the same thickness as the other pads around it and wrap a few or a lot of layers of Saran Wrap around the pad cup, rubber band it and it will work for a while.

Lose a neck cork: Wrap the neck with Dental Tape until the mouthpiece fits and put the mouthpiece on... it will last for a while. The Dental Tape will also work for a Clarinet mouthpiece or any Tenon.

Remember emergency is just for a short while not a permanent fix. Saran Wrap and Rubber Bands can work on saxophones, flutes, clarinets, brass water keys and just about anything that can be fixed in an emergency. It will likely last through the gig.

Tool List:

Saran Wrap
Rubber Bands

Small amount of baby power..

Thin Double Sided Tape
Dental Tape

Small Screwdriver

Spring Hook (Optional)

These tools will all fit in a very small bag and be easy to keep with you....

If the problem cannot be corrected with these few things... then it is not an emergency repair. It is a shop repair, and must be taken to your local woodwinds repair shop.

These solutions may or may not work for everyone, but it is a solution offered by Rheuben Allen – formerly of the Sax Shop in Los Angeles.

Full article →

Kenny G Saxophones & Rheuben Allen Saxophones offer a Five Year Limited Warranty

Kenny G Saxophones & Rheuben Allen Saxophones offer a Five Year Limited Warranty

Kenny G Saxophones & Rheuben Allen Saxophones are covered against defects in workmanship, materials, and manufacturing for five years from date of purchase. This warranty applies only to the original purchaser of the new Kenny G Saxophone & Rheuben Allen Saxophone and only when the original purchase is made from kdimusic.com. KDI Music, LLC, at its discretion, will find the best possible solution to the problem and remedy the situation in a timely manner.

 To receive warranty service, please contact KDI Music.com at 4inquiries.kdimusic@gmail.com; explain the problem via e-mail, date of purchase from KDI Music.com, and the serial number of instrument. The Warranty requires prior authorization from us before the instrument can be returned for warranty work. Proof of purchase must be presented at the time of warranty request.


Warranty Exclusions:

KDI Music, LLC, Kenny G Saxophones & Rheuben Allen Saxophones does not warrant against deterioration from perspiration, high humidity, extreme temperatures, oxidation or tarnish of finishes, or other external causes. KDI Music, Kenny G Saxophones & Rheuben Allen Saxophones disclaims and excludes liability for damage done to finish or plating by excess polishing or pressure or use of a polishing cloth or any other product that takes the plating off. Use a soft cloth, free of chemicals for all finishes. Wipe the fingerprints off often and dry moisture off inside and outside the horn as often as possible. Keep your instrument dry and in its case when storing the instrument.


Instruments that have been altered in any way, or the identification numbers removed or changed are not eligible for warranty.

KDI Music, LLC, Kenny G Saxophones & Rheuben Allen Saxophones disclaims and excludes liability for any incidental or consequential damages. Warranty does not cover damage resulting from abuse, negligence, accidents, lack of reasonable maintenance or failure to follow Care Instructions. Warranty does not cover loss or theft of instrument.

Warranty does not cover pads, corks, felts; normal use, normal upkeep, regulation or poor quality repair work done to the saxophone by local repairman and all problems must be reported within 5 days after discovery.

Thank you, 

Management of KDI Music, LLC – Limited LiabilityCorporation, a USA Company

Management of  Rheuben Allen & Associates, LLC,  a USA Company

Management of KG Saxophones, LLC, a USA Company

Rev 06/30/2016

 

Full article →

Why is it harder to play Soprano Sax than my Tenor Sax?

Playing the Soprano Sax is very different than playing the alto or tenor saxophones. The Tenor Sax and Alto Sax tend to respond with a loose embouchure and many tenor players strive to keep the embouchure loose for a big sound.

Soprano Sax needs a little firmer embouchure to play it well. Not tight so it does not respond but firm mostly for the upper register response.

For example when you first play the high notes just pushing the key does not mean the note will come in.. a slight adjustment to the embouchure is necessary.

Also the biggest mistake most players make when trying to play Soprano Sax is they do not push the mouthpiece far enough on the neck cork. If the mouthpiece is out a little too far then the bottom of the Soprano Sax and sometimes the high notes will not work.

Pushing the mouthpiece in helps on most saxophones for the response. Find what is called the “Sweet Spot” where everything works.

Remember to Practice as often as you can to achieve the intonation you desire.

We Hope This Helps!!

Thanks for reading from the KDI Music Staff

 

Full article →

A Passion for the Perfect Sound

All of us a KDI Music have “A Passion for the Perfect Sound”, in which we are adamant about teaching our younger generation the art of music. Whether it is to play Woodwinds, Brass, Stringed Instruments, Keyboards, Piano or Percussion or to Sing, it is important to all of us to continue this tradition. It doesn’t matter what genre they prefer or what instrument they play, we believe it is in everyone’s best interest to provide musical education for developing young minds.

To that end, we believe in providing quality instruments on our site for the beginning student to professional musicians. We at KDI Music have tested all the instruments we sell on our website and have even purchased many for our own performance use. I have personally purchased the Kenny G G-Series IV Soprano Sax Silver Body/Lacquered Keys for its tone value and looks. Our Staff has collectively purchased and performs with the Kenny G G-Series IV Alto and Soprano Saxes, E-Series IV Alto and Soprano Saxes, Black Diamond Alto Sax and the Rheuben Allen Series 5 Alto Saxophone.

We have both loaned and sold instruments to many organizations including the Nisei Week Foundation Marching Band and schools. We look forward to helping students experience the Marching Band, Concert Band or Orchestra in their schools, so please reach out to us to see if we can help.

 

Thanks for taking the time to read this blog.

The Staff at KDI Music, LLC

Full article →